Witch Rock

Atlas Obscura

Published May 15, 2012

The story of Witch Rock follows the same general pattern as just about every other spook story of this ilk. It begins with Native Americans shunning the area due to evil spirits and then switches gears to the European settlers who were also terrified of it but had a much more codified spiritual framework from which to name their spooks. In contemporary times, somebody just painted the silhouette of a broomstick-straddling witch on it.

There’s not a whole lot of information floating around about this rock either factually or supernaturally. For the latter, sounds of laughter, creepy voices, or full-bodied specters themselves are supposed to seep from the various nooks and crannies that can be found all over the rock.

Located on a corner residential lot that is actually somebody’s front yard, Witch Rock is more a hulking boulder than a rock, standing about 12 feet tall and about 15 feet wide. A large tree grows right up against the rock.

Adapted with Permission from: The New England Grimpendium by J.W. Ocker


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